Map of Female MPs Elected in the 2013 National Assembly Elections
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The map below displays data on female Member of Parliaments ("MPs") who won seats in the National Assembly Elections (the "NA Elections") which took place on 28 July 2013. Out of the eight political parties who contested the NA Elections, only two political parties received enough votes to receive seats in the National Assembly: the ruling Cambodian People's Party ("CPP") and the opposition Cambodian National Rescue Party ("CNRP"). The percentage of elected MPs that are women is 20.33%, with women winning only 25 seats out of 123. Of the 68 seats won by the CPP, 18 seats will go to women (26.47%) and of the 55 seats won by the CNRP, only seven will go to women (12.73%).

The key terms used in this map are explained as follows:

  • Total number of female MPs elected: the total number of women who won seats in the NA Elections.
  • Number of female CPP MPs elected: the number of women from the CPP who won seats in the NA Elections.
  • Number of female CNRP MPs elected: the number of women from the CNRP who won seats in the NA Elections.

Scroll your mouse over each province to see general data for that province. Click on each province to see the number of female MPs elected, by parties, for that province.

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Description

This chart shows the percentage of MPs elected to the National Assembly that are women by province. The total percentage of elected MPs that are women is 20.33%, with women winning only 25 seats out of 123. Out of the 24 provinces, in only 6 did women's representation reach over 30%, the Cambodian Millennium Development Goals target to be achieved by 2015. The province of Pailin had the highest level of women's representation at 100%, the single elected candidate being female. Two other provinces, Kratie and Svay Rieng, achieved women's representation of 60% or above. At the other end of the scale however, in 11 provinces, no women were elected.

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